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95

LA GIOCONDA SBARBATA (THE SHAVED MONA LISA)

by Andrea Branzi (from Casabella, no. 363, March 1972)

Rejection is no longer the secret dream of some derelict, or the prophetic doctrine of scattered groups: it will be the biggest collective discovery of this century. andrea branzi

Andrea Branzi rivals a positivist understanding of the avant-garde, outlining it as a quintessentially capitalist force harboring the “technical destruction of culture” and reflecting on its social, moral, religious,

and aesthetic meanings.

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LALA RUKH READING LALA RUKH

by Saira Ansari

Indeed, beyond nothingness, what is there? saira ansari

Among all the different opinions and readings on the personal, public, and professional life of the late Pakistani artist Lala Rukh, the largest consensus is that she was not the easiest person to decode. She spoke in few words and made images with far less.

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INTERVIEWS, PAST AND

PRESENTbyMariah Lookman

There is a very interesting story that somebody from Radio India wrote to Radio Pakistan saying , “You give us Roshan Ara Begum and you can have Kashmir!” lala rukh

In a polyphonic conversation composed of excerpts from interviews with Amin Gulgee, Hamra Abbas, Sarah Zaman, and Lala Rukh herself—that last recorded on the morning before the demolition of her studio—Mariah Lookman pens an intimate, posthumous portrait of the artist.

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JULIE BECKER THE DELIRIUM OF

DIGRESSION

by Sabrina Tarasoff (from Mousse #76, Summer 2021)

Distortions in time, changes in scale, senses of derealization and depersonalization. Makeshift force fields, cardboard boxes, corners of the mind, and iconic figures mobilized as transports of the imagination capable of stirring the mind out of its single room-squalor and into a “larger, more complex world.” sabrina tarasoff

Surrounded by lost things and abandoned lives, leftover ephemera, and fragments of the past, Sabrina Tarasoff ponders Julie Becker’s imagery as a domestically shaped fever dream.

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