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W&N Current Affairs HB/TPB May £18.99 320pp 978 0 297 86949 8 eBook: £18.99 / 978 0 297 86950 4

2012 Emmy winner – Outstanding Coverage of a Breaking News Story in a News Magazine for Undercover Syria for Channel 4.

RAMITA NAVAI City of Lies

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Real lives in modern Tehran – a searing, unforgettable insight into living and surviving in one of the world’s most brutally repressive regimes. ‘Let’s get one thing straight; in order to live in Tehran you have to lie, and you have to know how to lie like a pro. Morals don’t come into it. Lying in Tehran is about survival.’ Far removed from the picture of Tehran we glimpse in news stories, there is another, hidden city, where survival depends on an intricate network of lies and falsehoods. It is a place where Mullahs visit prostitutes, gangs sell guns supplied by corrupt Revolutionary Guards, cosmetic surgeons restore girls’ virginity and homemade porn is bought and sold in the bazaars. It is also the home of our eight protagonists, drawn from across the spectrum of Iranian society: the gun runner, the ageing socialite, the porn star, the assassin and enemy of the state who ends up working for the Republic, the volunteer religious policeman who undergoes a sex change, and the dutiful housewife who files for divorce. These are ordinary people forced to live extraordinary lives. Plotted around the city’s pulsing central thoroughfare, Vali Asr Street, City of Lies is an intimate and unforgettable portrait of modern Tehran, and of what it is to live, love and survive in one of world’s most brutally repressive regimes. Ramita Navai is a British-Iranian Emmy award-winning journalist and reporter for Channel 4's foreign affairs series, Unreported World. She has also worked as a journalist for the United Nations and was the Tehran correspondent for The Times from 2003 to 2006. She was awarded the Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Prize for Non-Fiction to assist in her research for City of Lies.

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Location: London Available for Interview @ramitanavai

Non-Fiction/Current affairs • May 2014