Page Text

SOUNDS OF AMERICA

of Music demonstrate that point in a very  convincing manner. From the richly haunted  playing of the Jupiter String Quartet,  Oberlin’s visiting quartet-in-residence, to the  exquisite sounds made by flautist Alexa Still  and the lovely singing of Oberlin alumna  soprano Ellie Dehn, the results are  unabashedly romantic in what might be  considered a healthy, American way.

Head of the Conservatory’s harp  department herself, Kondonassis contributes  precise articulation and a dazzling palette of  colours and styles in occasionally Technicolor  swirls of sound. Dehn is similarly impressive,  powerfully projecting the raw emotions of  ‘Aoua!’ before switching into a higher,  creamier gear for the third of the Chansons madécasses, then alternatively delightfully  and breathlessly in love throughout the  Cinq Mélodies populaires grecques.

This is Kondonassis’s 18th album and it helps  launch the Conservatory’s new Oberlin Music  CD label (the other release is Lorenzo  Palomo’s Dr Seuss’ The Sneetches, a symphonic  poem for narrator and orchestra) which, in true  guerrilla marketing style, was celebrated with  a November concert at trendy SubCulture  in New York City’s Greenwich Village.

Recorded at Oberlin’s Clonick Hall, the  detailed sound responds particularly well at  the lower volume levels appropriate to intimate  masterpieces. James O’Leary’s serious bookletnotes provide a provocative historical context  for the music focused on Ravel’s aesthetic  tendencies  midway between Debussy and César  Franck. Laurence Vittes

Rorem  Piano Album I. Six Friends Carolyn Enger pf  Naxos American Classics F 8 559761 (51’ • DDD)

The intriguing notion  of a CD containing  33 short piano pieces  by the engagingly

J O R D A N

I D E R

S T R

:

reflective American composer Ned Rorem,  each professing love or devotion, has been  affectionately realised by the American  pianist Carolyn Enger. Playing on a  beautifully recorded Steinway in Greenfield  Hall at the Manhattan School of Music,  Enger raises the miniatures to a higher level  by taking the time and care to recapture the  emotional impact each must have had when  their dedicatees read the inscription and title,  and then heard the music for the first time.  Taken together, the effect is pleasantly,  intimately discursive, although the pleasure  takes a while to kick in.  PHO T O G R A P H Y

Magical moments: Jory Vinikour (left), José Lemos and Deborah Fox at the Sono Luminus studio, Virginia

Rorem’s Piano Album I contains  27 compositions written between 1978 and  2001, 22 of which are receiving their world  premiere recordings. They were composed  as gifts for Rorem’s longtime companion Jim  Holmes, as well as a few for other friends and  colleagues. Each piece’s affectionate subtitle,  such as ‘On Christmas with love from Ned.  For Jim to teach to Sonny on rainy  afternoons’ (‘Serenade for Two Paws’),  enhances the modest listening experience  and makes the imagining more fun. ‘Each  piece fits on to one page which I decorated in  bright colors, and framed,’ Rorem wrote,  and Enger reflects this thought in the charm  of her playing.

There is no distinction in tone or language  between Piano Album I and Six Friends, which  are similar pieces written in 2006 and 2007 for  friends and colleagues including the actor  Marian Seldes and the pianist Jerome  Lowenthal on his 75th birthday.   Laurence Vittes

‘Io vidi in terra’  Ferrari Ardo Frescobaldi Cosi mi disprezzate. Se l’aura spira Gagliano Io vidi in terra Merula Canzonetta spirituale, ‘Hor ch’è il tempo di dormire’. Su la cetra amorosa Monteverdi Madrigals, Book 9 – Se dolce è’l tormento. Scherzi musicali – Quel sguardo sdegnosetto Piccinini Partite B Storace Balletto. Spagnoletta Strozzi L’amante segreto José Lemos counterten  Deborah Fox theo Jory Vinikour hpd  Sono Luminus F (CD + Y) DSL92172 (53’ • DDD • T/t). Blu-ray Disc contains programme in 7.1 DTS-HD MA 24/96kHz and 5.1 DTS-HD MA 24/192kHz

Marvellous as it is to  encounter the Brazilian  countertenor José  Lemos in opera,

chamber concerts and song recitals arguably  reveal the fuller scope of his effortless  technical agility and uncanny word-painting,  such as in this collection of 17th-century  Italian vocal works. The first thing you’ll  notice is the unusually resonant engineering.  The recording captures how his sensitive and  stylish collaborators sound in a resplendent  hall but also reveals how Lemos’s vocal  nuances mesh with the acoustic ambience.  This is as true of the conventional twochannel presentation as it is of the even more  lifelike Blu-ray audio bonus disc.

The programme opens and closes with  vocally elaborate pieces by Tarquinio Merula.  The rapid runs and offhand melismas in ‘Su la  cetra amorosa’ are playful and incisive, while  ‘Hor ch’è il tempo di dormire’ unravels in dark  tones that create an intimate, conversational  scenario quite different from KoΩená’s more  stately conception (DG, A/10). Barbara  Strozzi’s ‘L’amante segreto’ is a tour de force that  runs the gamut between lyrical brooding and an  upbeat conclusion. Space precludes describing  all of Lemos’s magical moments but let me  direct you to the title selection, where the word  ‘concento’ is set to a sudden, unexpected major  chord, and Lemos duly  adjusts his timbre to  acknowledge  its harmonic incongruity without  milking the effect. Good notes plus full texts  and translations enhance one of 2013’s most  rewarding releases. Jed Distler gramophone.co.uk

GRAMOPHONE FEBRUARY 2014 V