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W&N Science Hb / TPb September £20.00 / £14.99 320pp b&w diagrams 978 0 297 60937 7 / 978 0 297 60938 4 ebook: £20.00 / 978 0 297 60939 1 Audio: £19.99 / 978 1 4091 6108 0

‘Prepare to be astounded. There are moments when this book is so gripping it reads like a thriller’ – Mail on Sunday on Adam’s first book, Creation

ADAM RUTHERFORD A brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived The Stories in Our Genes

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From the acclaimed science writer and broadcaster, a dazzling tour of the latest genetic discoveries which are blurring the boundaries between science and history.

Since scientists first read the human genome in 2001 it has been subject to all sorts of claims, counterclaims and myths. Drawing together the latest discoveries in this rapidly changing area of science, Adam Rutherford shows that in fact our genomes should be read not like instruction manuals, but more like epic poems. Genes determine less than we have been led to believe about us as individuals, but vastly more about us as a species.

In this captivating journey through the expanding landscape of genetics, written with great clarity and wit, Adam Rutherford reveals what our genes now tell us about human history and what history tells us about our genes. From Neanderthal discoveries to microbiology, from redheads to dead royals, criminology to race relations, evolution to epigenetics, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived is a demystifying and illuminating new portrait of who we are and how we came to be.

adam rutherford is an acclaimed science writer and broadcaster. He has written and presented several series and programmes for bbC television and radio, including Inside Science, Playing God, and the new series The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry for bbC Radio 4, as well as writing for the science pages of the Observer. His first book, Creation, on the origin of life and synthetic biology, was shortlisted for the Wellcome Trust Prize.

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Location: London SE23 Available for interview adamrutherford.com @adamrutherford

W&N Non-Fiction • September 2016