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current archaeology

March 1969

CONTENTS

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INSIDE BACK COVER

EDITORIAL

SEEN AND HEARD: How German archaeology works.

NEOLITHIC: Contrasts in village life.

At INDEN the total excavation of a village of the Rössen culture reveals huge longhouses where whole families lived together under a single roof. EHRENSTEIN on the other hand is a village of small two-roomed huts whose wooden structure is wonderfully preserved by the damp conditions.

IRON AGE: Hill-forts and Oppida.

Greek pottery discovered at THE HEUNEBURG shows that this small hill-fort was occupied from the sixth to fourth centuries B.C. But by the first century B.C. the site at MANCHING shows that the Celts were already living in fair sized cities. A quick glance at a life-sized statue that once adorned the top of an Iron age barrow.

ROMAN: Towns and Fortresses.

An introductory look at TRIER, the most important town of Roman Germany, at recent work on the Limes, and at a JUPITER COLUMN that was recently discovered almost complete. The most important military discoveries have been at NEUSS, where six successive defences reveal the camps from, which in the first century Augustus and Tiberius tried to conquer the "Free" Germans across the Rhine. The only Roman town that does not underlie a modern town is the Colonia Ulpia Traiana at XANTEN, which is now in the process of being totally excavated. In the great town of COLOGNE, excavations stretch from the Roman Governor's Palace through to the Early Medieval Cathedral. But what were the two fabulously rich Frankish graves doing under the Cathedral?

BOOK REVIEWS

There are three well-known popular writers on archaeology in Germany: David Johnston reviews some of their works.

FEDDERSEN WIERDE

Our ancestors lived in this mud village, building it up layer by layer to raise it above the rising sea-level, until eventually in the 5th century they took to their ships and emigrated to England.

MEDIEVAL

A survey of some of the recent discoveries: princely burials at Gellep and Niederstotzingen and settlements on the north coast at Elisenhof and Haitabu. The Throne of Charlemagne has been revealed by recent excavations near the cathedral at PADERBORN.

DIARY FOR ARCHAEOLOGISTS.

COVER PICTURE Excavations at Feddersen Wierde.

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