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current archaeology

Diary

No. 63 Vol. VI, No. 4 Published September 1978

Edited by Andrew & Wendy Selkirk, 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX, Tel. 01-435 7517

Printed in Great Britain by David Green (Printers) Ltd. 19 September 1978 (7.77.7)

CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY IS PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR FOR A SUBSCRIPTION OF £3 ($6) A YEAR

SUBSCRIPTIONS SHOULD BE SENT TO: CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY 9 NASSINGTON ROAD LONDON NW3 2TX

Back Numbers 50p each (1-5 out of print) Binders to hold 12 issues £2.

"WELL , now that we have de­

cided to stop pontificating on this page, what is there to say? Let us begin at the top, with the news that Prince Charles has agreed to present the Rescue Archaeological Awards for 1978. The ceremony will take place at the British Museum on November 7th, when not only will the results of the BBC 'Chronicle' award for Independent Archaeologists be announced, but also the awards for the other categories given by The Times, Country Life, and the Illustrated London News. The BBC will be televising the whole ceremony and excerpts will be broadcast in the programme they are preparing on the Chronicle award tentatively scheduled for December 18th.

York

AND then, perhaps, I should tell

Charles on 16th October 1977, when a Gala Performance was held at the York Theatre Royal, with a special production entitled A King Shall Have A Kingdom, a portrait of Britain from AD 449 to 1066 in words and music, arranged and edited by former IT N newscaster Gordon Honeycombe, who shared the announcements with his BBC rival, Angela Rippon. Seats were sold at special gala prices and in this way over £4,000 was raised for archaeology. In all, more than £90,000 has been collected.

Meanwhile engineering rather than archaeology has been the order of the day at the Coppergate site, for £76,500 has just been spent on erecting steel shoring round the whole site, which will permit excavations to a depth of some 10 metres. An investment on this scale in one archaeological site is unprecented in Britain and will enable excavation to proceed down through all the Viking levels and even through to the Roman levels beneath. By Christmas the site should be well worth visiting!

you something about York. York is really a most interesting phenomenon, a fascinating attempt to treat archaeology as big business, to make use of the techniques of professional fund raising to carry out a major excavation. The biggest previous attempt was South Cadbury, but whereas South Cadbury relied entirely on independent sources, the York Archaeological Trust is firmly based on a substantial DoE grant of some £127,000 However more is needed to carry out their ambitious scheme of excavation of the Viking site at Coppergate, and so they have teamed up with one of York's biggest advertising agencies Borodin Communications, to conduct a major fund raising campaign. At first expenses exceeded income, but last summer the campaign really got under way. The turning point was perhaps the visit of Prince

Winston Churchill Memorial Trust

EVERY year the 'Winston

Churchill Memorial Trust awards Travelling Fellowships for various different categories of activity, and this year archaeology and local history form one of the eleven categories. These awards are not for academic studies, but enable men and women from all walks of life to visit countries overseas to acquire knowledge and experience which will make them more effective in their work and in the community when they return.

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