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CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY 108

CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY No. 108 Vol.X No.l Published February 1988

Edited by Andrew & Wendy Selkirk, 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX, Tel: 01-435 7517

CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY IS PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR FOR A SUBSCRIPTION OF £8 ($15) FOR SIX ISSUES

SUBSCRIPTIONS SHOULD BE SENT TO: CURRENT ARCHAEOLOGY 9 NASSINGTON ROAD LONDON NW3 2TX

Back numbers £1.40 each (1-6, 14 out of print) Binder to hold 12 issues £5

Printed in Great Britain by The Friary Press Ltd

8.2.88(1.88.8)

18 Meanwhile, at Burgh by Sands, Paul Austen has found a cobble foundation underlying at least part of the Turf Wall.

Aneolithic cursus with no en­ trances, a Bronze Age Princes palace, a 'wrong' tower on Hadrian's Wall and a Welsh chapel are the highlights of this latest issue of Current Archaeology,

20 In Books we look at The Great Journey, Beyond the Acropolis, Classical Landscape with Figures, Lascaux: the Final Photographic Record, The Roman Forum Site in London, The Roman Empire, and Welsh Archaeological Heritage.

3 In the Diary we first take a critical look at English Heritage's ideas as to how we should preserve our countryside, then on to the British Archaeological Awards, the Independents' Liaison Group, and a new building at Avebury

6 At Springfield just outside Colchester two major sites have been excavated. The first was a Neolithic cursus which did not appear to have any entrance. A mile away, at Springfield Lyons, a Bronze Age 'stronghold' was uncovered, but on top of this there was an unexpected Anglo-Saxon cemetery, and on top of that an even more unexpected late Saxon village. How many more such sites are being missed?

23 The Science Diary has a distinctly woody look. John Musty starts off by looking at Wetland Archaeology, and goes on to consider the problems of conserving wet wood, then to the ecology of the New Forest, wrong dates from the British Museum, the SBAC Co-ordinator, more lab reports, surveying equipment and a Roman blacksmith.

26 Just outside Llandrindod Wells, the little church of Capel Maelog was built in the twelfth/thirteenth century and abandoned in the sixteenth. It has just been rediscovered and totally excavated, revealing the cemetery that preceded the chapel - which turned out to be a rather odd building itself.

12 Gerry Corti and his wife decided to take up archaeology on his retirement. Having worked as a volunteer for several years, he now takes the lid off archaeology in the 1980s.

14 Hadrian's Wall was not quite so regular as it once seemed. At Peel Gap, Jim Crow has been finding an unexpected tower - and an unexpected sequence of wall foundation.

30 Letters ask Who are the Independents, reconsider That Dorset Greek, then Muck-spreading, Roman circuses, Are sites safe, and conclude with some popular views of archaeology - in French!

Cover Photo Hadrian's Wall, climbing up from Peel Gap towards the Steel Rigg crags. Photo: Jim Crow

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