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Current Archaeology 215 (Vol XVIII, No. 11) February 2008

Editorial Editor: Lisa Westcott lisa@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5585

Features Editor: Neil Faulkner neil@archaeology.co.uk Contributing Editor: Christopher Catling chris@archaeology.co.uk Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Selkirk andrew@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5584

Publisher: Robert Selkirk robert@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5581

Art Editor: Mark Edwards mark@archaeology.co.uk Advertising Manager: Libby Selkirk libby@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5582

Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH

Tel: 08456 44 77 07 (office hours) Fax: 08456 44 77 08 web: www.archaeology.co.uk Subscriptions Current Archaeology is published monthly for a subscription of £38 for 12 issues. Foreign subscriptions £48. Subscriptions should be sent to: Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: (office hours): 08456 44 77 07 or 020 8819 5590 Fax: 08456 44 77 08 Subs queries to: subs@archaeology.co.uk Web subs: www.archaeology.co.uk Back issues: £4 each / £5 non-UK Binders: (holds 12 copies) £10 / £12 Slip Cases: (holds 12 copies) £12 / £14

Printed by St Ives Unauthorised reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without written permission. The publisher, editor and authors accept no responsibility in respect of any products, goods or services which may be advertised or referred to in this issue. Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyright material. In the event of any material being used inadvertently or where it has proved impossible to trace the copyright owner, acknowledgement will be made in a future issue. 211207195

Contents

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Silbury Hill: A last look inside Silbury Hill is one of Britain’s most enigmatic and impressive prehistoric monuments. Plagued by structural problems and frequent collapse as a result of unsympathetic excavation and tunnelling in the past, the landmark mound was in serious danger. We take you inside for a last look, and delve into English Heritage’s newly completed conservation project.

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3D Laser Scanning for Heritage: The future of the past? 3D Laser Scanning has come a long way since 1990 and is a regular, if still

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changing, tool for archaeologists, conservators and building specialists. English Heritage Chief Archaeological Advisor David Miles explains how thefascinating technology has evolved, and how it is changing the way we ‘see’ archaeology.

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Hungate: The archaeology of modern urban poverty Seebohm Rowntree’s revolutionary 1901 study of poverty and town life in York inspired decades of social reform to eradicate poverty and construct a welfare state. Hungate, the area of Rowntree’s study, is today one of the most overlooked parts of historic York. However, all that is changing as

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