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Current Archaeology 217 (Vol XIX, No. 1) April 2008 Editorial Editor: Lisa Westcott lisa@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5585

Features Editor: Neil Faulkner neil@archaeology.co.uk News Editor: Christopher Catling chris@archaeology.co.uk Publisher: Robert Selkirk robert@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5581

Art Editor: Mark Edwards mark@archaeology.co.uk Advertising Manager: Libby Selkirk libby@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5582

Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH

Tel: 08456 44 77 07 (office hours) Fax: 08456 44 77 08 web: www.archaeology.co.uk Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Selkirk 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX andrew@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5584 Subscriptions Current Archaeology is published monthly for a subscription of £38 for 12 issues. Foreign subscriptions £48. Subscriptions should be sent to: Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: (office hours): 08456 44 77 07 or 020 8819 5580 Fax: 08456 44 77 08 Subs queries to: subs@archaeology.co.uk Web subs: www.archaeology.co.uk Back issues: £4 each / £5 non-UK Binders: (holds 12 copies) £10 / £12 Slip Cases: (holds 12 copies) £12 / £14

Printed by St Ives Unauthorised reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without written permission. The publisher, editor and authors accept no responsibility in respect of any products, goods or services which may be advertised or referred to in this issue. Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyright material. In the event of any material being used inadvertently or where it has proved impossible to trace the copyright owner, acknowledgement will be made in a future issue. 211207195

Contents Contents

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High stakes on the high seas

High stakes on the high seas In May 2007, Odyssey Marine announced that it was recovering a 17- ton hoard comprised of 500,000 coins from a shipwreck at an undisclosed location in the Atlantic, sparking official action by the Spanish government as well as an international uproar. Beneath the excitable headlines that greeted this news lurks a complex story with far-reaching, still unresolved, implications for how to deal with our underwater heritage. James Morrison delves deep into the tale of secrecy, confrontation and colonial-era wrecks heaving with bullion to expose issues with international legislation, and the growing tensions between academic archaeologists and commercially driven ‘treasure-hunters’ over how best to recover artefacts found in the world’s last great disputed domain: its ocean seabed.

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Silver of the Iceni 20 24

Silver of the Iceni

The Iceni are famous for two things – Boudica and gold. However, new research has revealed that the Iceni also made East Anglia’s first ever silver artefacts. There are no silver deposits in the region, so the metal must have been imported. To understand where the Iceni’s silver came from, Megan Dennis, specialist in Late Iron Age metalwork, examines the evidence for a complex society, fascinating politics, and evolving relationships with neighbours, the Continent, and Rome.

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The end of Roman Bath On a chill winter’s morning with steam rising from the Great Bath, it does not take much to understand why the temple and baths dedicated to Sulis Minerva were so

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