Skip to main content
Read page text

Page Text

With

Current Archaeology 221 (Vol XIX, No. 5) August 2008 Editorial Editor: Lisa Westcott lisa@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5585 Features Editor: Neil Faulkner neil@archaeology.co.uk News Editor: Christopher Catling chris@archaeology.co.uk Art Editor: Mark Edwards mark@archaeology.co.uk Sub Editor: Caitlin McCall caitlin@archaeology.co.uk Publisher: Robert Selkirk robert@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5581 Advertising Manager: Libby Selkirk libby@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5582 Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: 08456 44 77 07 (office hours) Fax: 08456 44 77 08 web: www.archaeology.co.uk Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Selkirk 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX andrew@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5584 Subscriptions Current Archaeology is published monthly for a subscription of £38 for 12 issues. Foreign subscriptions £48. Subscriptions should be sent to: Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: (office hours): 08456 44 77 07 or 020 8819 5580 Fax: 08456 44 77 08 Subs queries to: subs@archaeology.co.uk or online at: www.archaeology.co.uk Back issues: £4 each / £5 non-UK Binders: (holds 12 copies) £10 / £12 Slip Cases: (holds 12 copies) £12 / £14 Printed by St Ives Unauthorised reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without written permission. The publisher, editor and authors accept no responsibility in respect of any products, goods or services which may be advertised or referred to in this issue. Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyright material. In the event of any material being used inadvertently or where it has proved impossible to trace the copyright owner, acknowledgement will be made in a future issue. 240608190

Contents Contents

12

20

28

26

12

Roman Britain’s Great Plague? What started as a routine rescue dig on a Roman cemetery site in Gloucester became something else altogether: the discovery of a death-pit, with at least 91 tangled skeletons tipped into a metre deep hole. This dig may hold the first evidence that Britain, more than a thousand years before the Black Death, was struck by a Great Plague from the Continent.

20

Cod bones and commerce Sea fishing took off in the years around AD 1000. Why did this happen? Where were the fishing grounds? And was it part of a wider commercial revolution? New international Cambridge-led research has devised a scientific technique that uses cod bones to identify where the fish eaten by our medieval ancestors came from – with startling results.

26

Lost and found: the tale of Conesby Moat The moated site at Conesby disappeared in the 1920s beneath the slag heaps of the Normanby Park steel works. Time moved on and the works closed, leaving behind only the slag heaps, which were moved, and the site levelled. But what of the moat? It had been covered with slag – could anything have survived?

2

archaeologycurrent 221

Skip to main content