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Current Archaeology 222 (Vol XIX, No. 6) September 2008 Editorial Editor: Lisa Westcott lisa@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5585 Features Editor: Neil Faulkner neil@archaeology.co.uk News Editor: Christopher Catling chris@archaeology.co.uk Art Editor: Mark Edwards mark@archaeology.co.uk Additional design: Andy Bunyan Sub Editor: Caitlin McCall caitlin@archaeology.co.uk Publisher: Robert Selkirk robert@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5581 Advertising Manager: Libby Selkirk libby@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5582 Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: 08456 44 77 07 (office hours) Fax: 08456 44 77 08 web: www.archaeology.co.uk Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Selkirk 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX andrew@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5584 Subscriptions Current Archaeology is published monthly for a subscription of £38 for 12 issues. Foreign subscriptions £48. Subscriptions should be sent to: Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: (office hours): 08456 44 77 07 or 020 8819 5580 Fax: 08456 44 77 08 Subs queries to: subs@archaeology.co.uk or online at: www.archaeology.co.uk Back issues: £4 each / £5 non-UK Binders: (holds 12 copies) £10 / £12 Slip Cases: (holds 12 copies) £12 / £14

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Roundhouses: 3,000 years of prehistoric design In CA 21 (1970), we reported that only 200 roundhouses were known to archaeology. Today, the number of excavated roundhouses has risen to more than 4,000. Rachel Pope tells CA what has been learned about the design, use, and landscape setting of British prehistory’s standard ‘family home’.

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Enamelled vessels from Roman Britain: Celtic art and tourist knick-knacks Archaeologists are agreed that most of the bigger enamelled vessels of the Roman period came from Britain ‘Britain produces gold, silver, and other metals,’ declared Tacitus around AD 100. So, were Celtic artists making tourist knick-knacks for Roman soldiers the Roman period came from Britain ‘Britain produces gold, silver, and other metals,’ declared Tacitus around AD 100. So, were Celtic artists making tourist knick-knacks for Roman soldiers to take back home? Examples of their work has been found throughout Europe. Leading expert Ernst Künzl puts a British ‘souvenir’ into context.

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Inspired by Stonehenge Archaeologist Julian Richards has been collecting Stonehenge memorabilia for almost 30 years. From the serious and the educational to the absurd and the fanciful, Stonehenge is the subject of a truly diverse range of souvenirs. Julian's collection now forms the

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