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Current Archaeology 223 (Vol XIX, No. 7) October 2008 Editorial Editor: Lisa Westcott lisa@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5585 Features Editor: Neil Faulkner neil@archaeology.co.uk News Editor: Christopher Catling chris@archaeology.co.uk Art Editor: Mark Edwards mark@archaeology.co.uk Additional design: Andy Bunyan Sub Editor: Caitlin McCall caitlin@archaeology.co.uk Publisher: Robert Selkirk robert@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5581 Advertising Manager: Libby Selkirk libby@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5582 Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: 08456 44 77 07 (office hours) Fax: 08456 44 77 08 web: www.archaeology.co.uk Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Selkirk 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX andrew@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5584 Subscriptions Current Archaeology is published monthly for a subscription of £38 for 12 issues. Foreign subscriptions £48. Subscriptions should be sent to: Current Publishing, Barley Mow Centre 10 Barley Mow Passage, London W4 4PH Tel: (office hours): 08456 44 77 07 or 020 8819 5580 Fax: 08456 44 77 08 Subs queries to: subs@archaeology.co.uk or online at: www.archaeology.co.uk Back issues: £4 each / £5 non-UK Binders: (holds 12 copies) £10 / £12 Slip Cases: (holds 12 copies) £12 / £14

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Contents Contents

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John Evans and the invention of prehistory

In the brilliant mind of John Evans, geological knowledge and a lifelong fascination with antiquity collided to become the infant concept of prehistory. Detailed in his 1859 lecture to the London Society of Antiquaries, Evans' breakthrough transformed archaeological study forever. New research marking the 100th anniversary of his death has revealed the struggle and skullduggery that was necessary in order for prehistory to take its proper place in the study of the past.

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This old house: Excavations at Chiswick House

Lord Burlington's elegant London residence, Chiswick House, was the building that inspired the 18th century Palladian architectural revolution. The gardens were equally influential, and are recognised as the birthplace of the English landscape movement. Tourism has taken its toll on the Estate, and thus it is currently being revitalised by English Heritage. Recent excavations have turned up evidence of the illustrious past of this beloved London oasis.

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