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Current Archaeology 234 (Vol XX, No. 6) September 2009 Editorial Editor: Lisa Westcott lisa@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5580 Features Editor: Neil Faulkner neil@archaeology.co.uk News Editor: Christopher Catling chris@archaeology.co.uk Art Editor: Mark Edwards mark@currentpublishing.com Sub Editor: Caitlin McCall caitlin@archaeology.co.uk Publisher: Robert Selkirk rob@currentpublishing.com Current Publishing, Lamb House, Church Street, London W4 2PD Tel: 08456 44 77 07 (office hours) Fax: 08456 44 77 08 web: www.archaeology.co.uk Editor-in-Chief: Andrew Selkirk 9 Nassington Road, London NW3 2TX andrew@archaeology.co.uk 020 8819 5584 Advertising Page Advertising: Nick Charles nick@currentpublishing.com 020 8819 5573 Leaflet Advertising: Laurence Robertson laurence@currentpublishing.com 07872 177971 Subscriptions Current Archaeology is published monthly for a subscription of £38 for 12 issues. Foreign subscriptions £48. Subscriptions should be sent to: Current Publishing, Lamb House, Church Street, London W4 2PD Tel: (office hours): 08456 44 77 07 or 020 8819 5580 Fax: 08456 44 77 08 Subscription queries to: subs@archaeology.co.uk or online at: www.archaeology.co.uk Back issues: £4 each / £5 non-UK Binders: (holds 12 copies) £10 / £12 Slip Cases: (holds 12 copies) £12 / £14 Printed by St Ives Unauthorised reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without written permission. The publisher, editor and authors accept no responsibility in respect of any products, goods or services which may be advertised or referred to in this issue. Every effort has been made to secure permission for copyright material. In the event of any material being used inadvertently or where it has proved impossible to trace the copyright owner, acknowledgement will be made in a future issue. 270709180

Contents

Contents

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Buckles, belts and borders Regional differences of style in buckles and belt-fittings can be used to build a picture of the political turmoil during the last days of the Western Roman Empire. Stuart Laycock’s new evidence shows how these archaeological markers can also show collaboration, co-operation and conquest.

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Making a mint According to Roman propaganda, the wild natives of Britannia were backward and barbarous. However, a new study of coin-making debris is showing that they were, in fact,

metalworkers of a skill equal to those of Rome. We take a look at the evidence left behind by these tribal mintmasters.

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Galloping down the centuries Study of chalk hill-figures in Britain has traditionally been an exercise in speculation. Now, improved dating technology is helping to unravel their mystery, placing them more securely in an historical context. Paul Newman explains.

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Hill Hall One of the first classical Renaissance houses built in England, Hill Hall endured a fall from grace,

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