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Is Technology Good for Education? NEIL SELWYN Monash University ‘Selwyn’s book offers a much-needed critical analysis of education technology, moving beyond the overly simplified positions that ed-tech is good or ed-tech is bad or ed-tech is even inevitable.’ Audrey Watters, education writer and author of the blog ‘Hack Education’ ‘The book opens up “new” ways of thinking and conceptualising digital education … All those in education, whether they are “technophiles” or “technophobic”, must read this book.’ Educational Futures According to many experts, the rapid digitization of education over the past ten years has undoubtedly been a ‘good thing’. Selwyn offers a critical counterpoint to this received wisdom, challenging some of the central ways in which digital technology is presumed to be positively affecting education. SERIES: Digital Futures 190 x 124mm / 192 pages / 2016 HB / 978-0-7456-9646-1 / £35.00 / $45.00 / €46.90 PB / 978-0-7456-9647-8 / £9.99 / $12.95 / €13.90 ebook available

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I am Not a Brain Philosophy of Mind for the 21st Century MARKUS GABRIEL University of Bonn Translated by Christopher Turner In this book, philosopher Markus Gabriel challenges an increasing trend in science towards neurocentrism, the assumption that the self is identical to the brain. In a sharp critique, he presents a new defense of free will and provides a timely introduction to philosophical thought about the self – with verve, humor and surprising insights. 216 x 138mm / 240 pages / July 2017 UK, September 2017 US HB / 978-1-5095-1475-5 / £20.00 / $25.00 / €26.90 ebook available

Why Democracies Need Science HARRY COLLINS AND ROBERT EVANS Both of Cardiff University ‘Scientific and technological advances have a huge impact on our lives, yet science and society have an ambivalent relationship: science needs democracy to flourish but its techniques are beyond political accountability. In this thought provoking book, Collins and Evans assert that “science gives substance to the way of being of democracy.” Consequently, science is a key to achieving and safeguarding our democratic ideals.’ Barry Barish, Caltech ‘Free-market ideology threatens both science and democracy. Collins and Evans respond not with philosophical arguments but an appeal to common sense. They ask us first to see that we face a basic moral choice, and then to choose the values of modern science. A provocative and thoughtful book.’ Mark Brown, California State University Harry Collins and Robert Evans suggest it is time to think again about how scientific advice should be sought and used in policymaking. They argue that, rather than democracies needing to be protected from scientific expertise outside of the political sphere, democratic societies need to learn how to value science in this new age of uncertainty. 216 x 138mm / 208 pages / February 2017 UK, April 2017 US HB / 978-1-5095-0960-7 / £50.00 / $64.95 / €67.90 PB / 978-1-5095-0961-4 / £15.99 / $22.95 / €21.90 ebook available

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Bruno Latour GERARD DE VRIES University of Amsterdam ‘Gerard de Vries knew Latour before Latour was cool. In this wonderful new book, de Vries uses his experience and insight to place Latour in a different light from that shown by other commentators. Without a book by de Vries on Latour, the literature would have a sizeable hole in the front yard. That hole is now filled.’ Graham Harman, Southern California Institute of Architecture (on leave from the American University in Cairo) Bruno Latour, a crucial figure in contemporary philosophy and social science, has revolutionized our understanding of science, law, politics and religion. In this engaging book, Gerard de Vries provides one of the first overviews of Latour’s thought, outlining its development with clarity and skill. SERIES: Key Contemporary Thinkers 229 x 152mm / 240 pages / 2016 HB / 978-0-7456-5062-3 / £55.00 / $69.95 / €73.90 PB / 978-0-7456-5063-0 / £16.99 / $24.95 / €22.90 ebook available

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