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THE TABLET A W eek ly N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v i e w DUM VOBIS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS V E STR IS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

Front the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Voi.. 162. No. 4867.

London, August ig, 1933.

Sixpence.

R eg is t e r e d at th e General P ost Of f i c e as a New s pa per

New s and No t e s ..........2 25 “ Here are A rm ies” . . . 229 Our Lady of Boulogne . . . 230 An Open Letter to the Right Rev. A. W. F.

Blunt, D.D., Bishop of Bradford ............................ 231 “ Pro Russia ” 233 R e v ie w s :

Popular H i s t o r y ......... 234 Our Own Country . . . 234

CONTENTS Page

Page

R e v ie w s (Oontd.) : A Case of Bad Manners 235 Vita Venturi Saaculi . . . 236 New Books and Music . . . 236 From The Tablet of Ninety Years A g o ............................ 237 Books Received ................. 237 L e t t e r s to th e E d it o r : Scapular Faculties . . . 238 Limitation of Armaments 238 “ Marydown ” 238 Anglicans and “ Sacra1* mental Experience” . . . 239 Shacks ............................ 239

Correspondence :

Page

Rome (Our Own Correspondent’s Weekly Letter from) ............................241 Tristan da C u n h a ................. 243 Monsignor Kolbe on the term “ Roman Catholic ” 243 Ordinations ............................ 243 E t Ce t e r a .............................. 244 Obituary ...............................2 45 Catholic Education Notes . . . 246 The Eucharistic Congress... 246

Or b i s T errarum :

Page

England ............................247 Scotland ............................ 247 Wales ............................ 247 Ireland .............. f . .. 248 Canada ............................ 248 China ............................ 248 France ............................ 250 Luxemburg 250 Spain ............................ 250 Syria 252 Com in g E v e n t s ...................2 52 Social and Personal .. . 252 Chess ....................................... 252

NOTANDA Eventful days in the Irish Free State. A Tablet leader-writer suggests a National Government (p. 229). Plain words for the Anglican Bishop of Bradford. His reiterated and unillustrated charge against “ the Roman Church” (p. 231).

Another Centenary—Our Lady of Boulogne’s. Useful notes for the imminent celebrations (p. 230).

Fish-days for Protestants. A Nazi appeal in Pomerania recalls some English schemes in Tudor days (p. 228). Nazi attacks on Chancellor Dollfuss. Extracts from a leaflet dropped from the sky on an Austrian town (p. 226).

Shacks, Nudists, and other too-familiar objects of the seashore. Notes and a Letter (pp. 227, 239).

Feng in retreat—not military but religious (p. 228).

A centenary in elementary education. What happened on August 17, 1833 (p. 246).

NEWS AND NOTES A MONG this week’s events, there is one which should give pause to those enemies of the Church who are always crying out against “ The Priest in Politics ” and “ The Roman Mischief- maker.” If it were not for the definite ecclesiastical laws which are known as the Statutes of Maynooth, there would be manifold and perhaps sanguinary trouble in the Irish Free State to-morrow. I t had been both arranged and announced th a t church- parades of the new National Guards would be held in every parish to-morrow morning. But the Irish Bishops, a t their Maynooth Synod a few years ago, prudently forestalled ill-placed and ill-timed political demonstrations in or near Catholic churches in Ireland ; and their legislation has received the so

New Series. Voi. CXXX. . No. 4,266.

called “ Roman Mischief-maker’s ” approval. The relevant Statute would be applied to political parades of all kinds, whatever Party might propose them. General O’Duffv, a loyal and thorough­ going Catholic, had only to be told of the Statute. He obeyed it instantly and cancelled the church- parades.

While some of the 5,600,000 “ wireless ” licences now held by British citizens are in the names of persons who make only infrequent use of their privilege, the vast majority have been issued to heads of families and institutions ; and the number of fairly regular listeners cannot, therefore, be much less than 20,000,000. Not even the invention of printing was of more consequence to mankind. Moreover, " wireless ” has taken possession of all classes within ten short years. Printing worked its revolution more slowly ; indeed, for hundreds of years after Gutenburg died, most of the people in our rich and progressive England could see no more in a printed book than a neat crowd of black marks on white paper. The Radio Exhibition now open in London, proves th a t the expected halt in radio-telephony’s technical progress has not taken place. Listening-in becomes better and cheaper every year ; and the responsibility on moral leaders becomes heavier.

As their Government signed the Four-Power Pact, it would be wise for the German people to reflect upon such speeches as th a t of Herr Habicht, German “ Inspector for Austria,” to which we made allusion last week. After smashing into splinters the hope of an Austro-German understanding, this usurping “ Inspector ” of another State’s citizens declared th a t “ the only hope of peace in Europe is to settle Central Europe by uniting Germany and Austria on a Nazi basis.” How do Herr Habicht’s masters in Berlin and Munich reconcile this th reat with a pact which is supposed to guarantee European peace for ten years ?

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