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March 16, 1935;

THE TABLET N. Weekly N e w s p a p e r a n d R e v ie w

DUM VOBIS QUATU I, AMUR ANIMOS ETIAM ADDIMUS UT IN INCCEPTIS VESTRIS CONSTANTER MANEATIS

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

V ol. 165. No. 4949.

L ondon, March 16, 1935.

Six p e n c e .

Registered at the Generai P ost Office as a Newspaper.

Page

News and No t e s .............. 821 For Menevia Bereaved ... 325 The Next White Paper ... 825 Non Pecuniat Oleum! ... 326 Life in Soviet Russia ... 327 Reviews :

Old Times, Old Ways . .. 328 A Fictional Stigmatica . . . 329 By Mother St. Paul . . . 329 Salopia from the Saddle 330 Capital Sins' and Cardinal

Virtues . . . .............. 331 New Books and Music . .. 332

CONTENTS

L e n t e n P a storals :

Liverpool ......................... Nottingham........................ Cardiff ......................... Correspondence :

Rome (Our Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) ....................... . Death of the Bishop of Menevia .............. ••• Obituary ......................... Letters to the Editor :

The Coming Canoniza­

tions .............. . ••• The Family Means Test ... Blessed John Ogilvy ...

Page

332 334 335

337 340 340

340 340 340

Page

Et Ce t e r a ........................... 341 Cardinal de B e r n is .................342 From The Tablet of Long

A g o ...................................... 342 Work on the L a n d ................ 342 A Clerkenwell Pilgrimage ... 342 Capuchin Lenten Missions 343 Sacrilege at Wolverhampton 343 The Catholic Stage Guild ... 343 Orbis Terrarum:

England ........................... 344 Ireland ........................... 344 British East Africa ... 345 Burma ........................... 345 Canada ........................... 345

Orbis T errarum (Oontd.) :

Page

China France Italy Spain U.S.A.

... 345 ... 345 ... 345 . .. 346 . .. 346

So c ia l and P ersonal . .. 346 The Cambridge Summer

School ........................... 346 Coming Events ................ 346 Books R e c e i v e d ................ 348 Ch e s s ................................... 348

NOTANDA

BB. John Fisher and Thomas More. A translation in full of the Holy Father’s address at the reading of Tuto for the Canonization (p. 337).

Cambria’s great loss. Death of the Bishop of Menevia (pp. 325, 340).

The Lord Privy Seal’s visit to Russia. Will the Berlin goose’s sauce be also the Moscow gander’s? (p. 325). .

A Mexican Nemesis. A Tablet leader-writer composes a variation on the old theme, non olei pecunia (p. 326).

More Lenten Pastorals. Good reading, and good counsel, on the subject of our English Martyrs (p. 332).

Dr. Venizelos in exile. The deserved failure of a wanton bid for civil war (p. 321).

Comments on Bolivia’s case as presented by a writer in The Times (p. 324).

Santander’s mourning. What 50,000 Asturians thought of a Red sacrilege (pp. 324, 346).

NEWS AND NOTES

I T has been a sore point with Dr. Eleutherios Venizelos th a t the islands called the Dodecanese (“ The Twelve Isles ” ) are under the I ta lia n flag, despite the fact th a t nearly all the islanders speak Greek and th a t the Tittoni-Venizelos agreement, concluded just after the Great War, gave them to Greece. But it was with thankfulness th a t the flying Cretan beheld I ta ly ’s bunting over ' and about th e harbour of Kasos—or Caso as the

Italians call th a t island—in the glare of last Tuesday’s noonday sun. If Kasos had been Greek, the shell-smitten cruiser Aver off would have had to face a long voyage to Cyprus or to Alexandria, with grave risk of capture. But Dr. Venizelos has landed on what is de facto Italian soil, and is safe from Athenian vengeance. Rumour says th a t he will make England his home. While gratefully remembering this turbulent statesm an’s service to the Allies of 1914-18, we must express the hope th a t he will spend the winter of his days in a climate more congenial to a man of Cretan birth. There is a bad mark against his name. Granting th a t the Administration now established in Greece is far from admirable, we nevertheless feel strongly th a t civil war is not the way to change it. With his eyes open, M. Venizelos deliberately risked a copious and hateful shedding of blood in Greece. Knowing th a t he had few followers in Athens and th a t the Army would not come over a t his call, the best he could hope for was an obedient Crete and a series of successes in Macedonia, to be followed by a victorious march through Thessaly to Athens. But such victories would have meant months of bloody fighting and would have left the victor to protect an exhausted Greece from Turkish and Bulgarian and perhaps Italian demands. With the qualification Dispone domui tuce, we congratulate the Government of M. Tsaldaris upon its prompt and almost bloodless suppression of a wanton revolt. What Athens has now to do is to rid Greek politics of the Vae victis principle and spirit. ________

Seldom have we regretted more than we did last Tuesday morning the present state of popular journalism. Millions of readers who are also voters and therefore th e arbiters of national policy were supplied with only meagre summaries of the very important Commons debate of the night before on the defence of our country. The news-editors lavishly served out the usual ration of gossip and crime, varied by snapshots of scantily clad ladies ; but they stinted the speeches of the nation’s leaders and the P a r ty spokesmen. In the Daily Mail, for example, there was no mention a t all of SirjStafford Cripps, who wound up the debate from the Labour side. Yet Sir Stafford’s speech contained an admission which, when fairly pressed to its logical conclusion, demolishes nearly all the arguments

N ew S er ie s . Vol. CXXXIII. No. 4348.

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