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January 25, 1936

THE TABLET y l Weekly N ew sp aper a n d R ev iew

DUM V O B IS GRATULAMUR ANIMOS ET IAM ADDIM U S OT IN INCCEPTIS V E S T R IS CONSTANTER MANE ATI S

From the Brief of His Holiness Pius IX to The Tablet, June 4,1870.

Vol. 167. No. 4994. London, J anuary 25, 1936.

Sixpence.

Reoistered at the General P ost Office as a Nkwspapeb.

News and Notes . .. Page . .. 101 The House of Windsor . . . 105 P ro Rcge ................ . . . 105 Patriotism ................ . . . 106 Montreal Street Names . . . 107 Books Received . . . 108 Review s :

Dr. Phillips’ Second

Volume ................ . . . 109 P e r so n a l i ty ................ . . . 109

CONTENTS

Page

Review s (Oontd.) :

Outstanding Novel s—

LXYII ................................1 10 “ Anon’s ” L a t e s t .......... 110 The Life of L i v e s .......... I l l New Books and Music . . . I l l Encyclical Letter— Gontci. 112 Dr. Hinsley in the North 113 King George the F ifth . . . 114 From The Tablet of Long

A g o ............................................ 115

Page

Correspondence :

Rome (O ur Own Corre­

spondent’s Weekly Letter from) . . . 117 New Expressions of Religious Life . .. ................ 118 Et Ctetera . . . ................ 119 Obituary ................ 120 Orbis Terrarum :

England

W ales

Ireland

Andorra

Australia

................ 123

................ 124

................124

................124

................ 124

Page

Orbis Terra rum (Contd.) :

Canada ................ . .. 124 France ................ . . . 125 Germany ................ . .. 125 Iraq ................ . . . 126 Italy ................ . . . 126 Manchukuo . . . 126 Mexico . . . 127 Poland ................ . . . 127 Spain ................ . .. 127 West Africa . . . 128 Coming E vents . . . 128 Social and P ersonal . . . 128 Chess ............................ . . . 128

NOTANDA The demise of the Crown. A message from the Holy Father. Many announcements (pp. 101-2, 114).

In a triad of articles The Tablet’s leader-writers eulogize the late good King, acclaim his valiant successor and discuss true Patriotism (pp. 105-7).

The Encyclical on the Priesthood. A further instalment of the official English text (p. 112).

Peace at last between Bolivia and Paraguay. Hints at a League of South American Nations (p. 103).

The spread of the Liturgy among lay-folk. Some encouraging facts (p. 104).

’Ware the Red Hand! Some suspectable backers of the appeal for a School Theatre Fund in England (p. 103).

Cardinal Cerretti. How the memory of a great Churchman is being perpetuated under the Southern Cross (p. 124).

Montreal’s street names. Romance and piety in a city which breathes “ an exoticism not only of nationality but of religion ” (p. 107).

A heavy obituary. Many losses among both clergy and laity (pp. 120, 122).

NEWS AND NOTES M UCH more than formal condolence animated the message sent last Tuesday by our Pope to our King. His Holiness does not forget that George the Fifth was reigning when, after more than three hundred years, direct relations between the Holy See and the Court of St. James’s were restored. Nor is Pius XI unaware that George V, throughout twenty years, had to suffer for supporting his Ministers in respect of the embassy to the Vatican. This is not the moment for recalling anybody’s ill-spirited ipsissima verba ; but our tribute to the

New S e r ie s . Vol. CXXXV. No. 4393.

late Monarch would be enfeebled if we did not state that some of the things said about him and written to him by bitter enemies of the Church almost amounted to threats and were therefore the very worst way of moving His Majesty. But let us hasten away from that sorry business. The Papal telegram of last Tuesday was a natural sequel to the warmly cordial words about King George’s and Queen Mary’s Jubilee which the Sovereign Pontiff uttered at the time of the Fisher and More canonizations. Our Queen, in a sorrow for which this world can proffer no balm, is upheld by the most paternal of prayers.

Poor ingrates were we if, after reproaching the British Broadcasting Corporation in these columns for what we have regarded as its errors and lapses, we failed to praise its fine behaviour during the days of national suspense and mourning. Last Saturday night, at the close of a serious concert, we stood up in the lonely room where we had been writing, to hear “ God Save the King ” as usual. But there was no “ as usual ” about it. The musicians, who have played the tune hundreds of times, entirely emerged from the perfunctory into the palpably sincere. Their playing was a prayer. And when Monday came, with its accelerando of anxiety, the B.B.C. arrangements were quietly modulated to the nation’s fears. Frivolous “ variety,” excerpts from pantomimes, crooning and jazz were turned off. Every fifteen minutes, Big Ben chimed the quarter ; and between the chimes the ticking of a clock solemnly but not morbidly told off the minutes until the very end. At ten o’clock on Monday night, there were short prayers and anthems and brief readings from Holy Scripture. These must have done immense good to those listeners in our partly re-paganized country who have been brought up without any kind of church-going. And on Tuesday came the Prime Minister’s broadcast : simple, eloquent, loyal, hopeful, and all uttered in the fear of God.

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