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THE TABLET A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER AND REVIEW ESTABLISHED 1840

VOL. 170 No. 5069

REGISTERED AS A NEWSPAPER

LONDON JULY 3rd, 1937

SIXPENCE

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK . .

PRINCIPAL

1

TH E NATIONALIST ADVANCE IN BRITAIN ; TH E PRESS BETWEEN TH E NATIONS ; A F INANCIAL SHOCKABSORBER ; TH E FRENCHM AN ’S M ONEY ; M .C HAUT EM P S ’ PROGRAMM E ; SOCIALISTS AND TH E SENATE ; T H E FRENCH H O T E L CRISIS ; TH E FACTORIES B ILL ; WHEN LONGER HOURS ARE HARMLESS ; WHEN UNIFORM IT Y IS NECESSARY ; B ELLICOSE PACIFISM ; A COMMUNIST PO STER LEADING A R T IC L E S ............................................ 4

1. TH E R IN G AND TH E BOOK 2. A CASSANDRA IN A HURRY A CRITICISM OF MARX ......................... 5

II. Marx, the Visionary By M . . D 'A RCY, S .J . M IR A C U L IS M ....................................................... 9

By DR. F . M . R . WALSHE HYDE PARK ....................................................... 9

By M IC HA EL TRAPPES-LOM AX ROME L E T T ER ......................................................11

CONTENTS

THE CATHOLIC PRESS IN GERMANY . . 12 THE HOLY OFFICE AND DOCTRINES OF

R A C E ............................................................ 13 BOOKS OF THE WEEK ......................... 14

TH E REFORM A T IO N , TH E MASS AND TH E PR IE ST H OOD . Vol. I I ; M EN AND TENDENCIES ; IN PARENTH ESIS ; A FTER MANY DAYS ; TH E GOLDEN SOVEREIGN ; HEBREW R EL IG IO N BETWEEN THE *GHLIVJI'I , IILDIXL. n UHIUlUlS DE.1V»r,JM> I n I» TESTAMENTS THE CHURCH ABROAD .............................. 20 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 22 THE CONVERTS’ AID SOCIETY . . . 23 TOWN AND COUNTRY .............................. 24 OBITUARIES ..................................................... 26 THE CATHOLIC UNION OF GREAT

BRITAIN ......................................................30

THE WORLD WEEK BY WEEK The Nationalist Advance in Britain

The Nationalists are continuing their advance west o f Bilbao and now hold the country between ten and twenty miles towards Santander. These military operations, through the nature of the country, are slow, although they encounter little armed opposition. As they get to Santander they will encounter the regiments which withdrew when it became hopeless to seek to hold Bilbao any longer. The failure of the Valencia authorities to organize any sort of successful offensive continues to be striking. Little is heard of the projected drives from Cordoba to the Portuguese frontier, or through Huesca to Saragossa, although their supporters in this country continue to describe how the Valencia Government has at last brought order out of chaos, and has trained a People’s Army. The chief events of the last week or two have not been military. They have been the marked and welcome indications of a change in opinion in this country. The questions asked in the House of Commons are symptomatic. For many a long month questions prompted by Nationalist sympathies were only asked by a handful of members, principally Catholic members like Mr. Denville, Mr. Crossley, Commander Bower, Sir Nicholas Grattan-Doyle, and Mr. Grant-Ferris, or by Mr. Lennox Boyd and Mr. Cazalet, and were answered, often rather unsympathetically, by the Government spokesmen. Such days seem to be over, and the ordinary Conservative members are beginning to make as much of a show as the Opposition, now plainly discomforted, used to do. The Government need not be criticised for having waited and allowed public opinion slowly to educate itself. Judges of these things estimate that the British public should be given two years to distinguish the wheat from the chaff on unfamiliar foreign issues. And a great deal that was being confidently repeated as recently as March is little heard today. The Manchester Guardian observer in Spain, to whose conclusions we have several times drawn attention, stated on Thursday in his final summary that it must be considered a moot point which came first, the rebellion or the proletarian revolution. That is a great concession to historical reality. The great concession which political reality calls for, more and more plainly every day, is that a civil war shall be recognized as a civil war, and that both the contending parties shall be placed on the same footing as belligerents. The Press Between the Nations

Mr. Eden reiterated in the House of Commons, on Monday, His Majesty’s Government’s plea to the Press for restraint in the present difficult times. It is a curious fact that the Members of Parliament who are most pertinacious in calling the Government’s attention to anti-British outbursts in Italy or Germany, are the people least conscious that there is any just ground of complaint to be brought against the British Press as well.

Mr. Eden, continually underlining the harm that the abuse of foreigners does, whoever perpetrates it, endeavoured to awaken the Opposition to this wider aspect. The simple truth is that for many months now papers like the Daily Herald and the News Chronicle have been in the habit of representing both Germany and Italy, lumped together as “ the Dictatorships,” as the accepted enemies of this country.

When Lord Hardinge, in a recent letter to The Times, raised this issue of the responsibility of those journalists who write on foreign affairs, Mr. Vernon Bartlett who, as diplomatic correspondent of the News Chronicle is a conspicuous offender, explained that people in his position must have in the forefront of their minds the public at home for which they are writing, not foreign opinion abroad. What in fact happens day after day is that these accounts are written from a strongly partisan standpoint, which is immensely aggravated by the way in which they are sub-edited and given large dramatic headings. A free Press is also a commercial Press, envisaging the supply of daily reading matter as a

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