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CONTENTS

8 Introduction: On behalf of gardeners

Setting contemporary head gardeners in context

26 THE NATURALIST

Ned Price, The Weir, Herefordshire Gardening, for Ned, is all about being close to nature, creating an environment where birds, butterflies, bees and bats can all be happy. So he doesn’t mind a bit when visitors complain it’s not a garden at all.

40 THE GENEROUS GARDENER Fergus Garrett, Great Dixter, East Sussex

For years he gardened alongside the most revered man in British horticulture, Christopher Lloyd. Now Fergus has inherited the great iconoclast’s colourful mantle, how does it feel to go on gardening alone?

58 A SURVIVOR’S TALE

Paul Pulford, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London Addicted to heroin and living on the streets, Paul was saved from certain death, he believes, by gardening. Now, in his rooftop garden on Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall, he uses the healing power of gardening to rescue others.

72 BUT IS IT ART? Mick Evans, Packwood House, Warwickshire

Mick always wanted to be an artist. Instead, he exchanged his paintbrush for a trowel. But in developing a nineteenth-century model into a distinctive new style of planting, has he become an artist after all ?

90 GARDENING LIKE A COW

Beatrice Krehl, Waltham Place, Berkshire Swiss-born Beatrice embraces ground elder, coaxes bindweed up canes, and refuses to wage war on slug or snail. Gardening in Britain, she declares, is a form of barbarism. So just what kind of a gardener is she?

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