Skip to main content
Read page text

4

5

6

7

8

9

2010). On its role in abolishing the slave trade see J. Walvin, England, Slaves and Freedom, 1776–1838 (London, 1986) and A. Hochschild, Bury the Chains: The British Struggle to Abolish Slavery (London, 2005). Millenarianism has such a long history that a comprehensive bibliography is impossible here: a classic study of medieval millenarianism is N. Cohn, The Pursuit of the Millennium: Revolutionary Millenarians and Mystical Anarchists of the Middle Ages (London, 1957), while important analyses of the phenomenon in more recent periods are J. F. C. Harrison, The Second Coming: Popular Millenarianism, 1780–1850 (London, 1979) and J. Boyer, When Time Shall Be No More: Prophecy Belief in Modern American Culture (Cambridge, Mass., 1992). F. Ley, Mme de Krüdener et son Temps, 1764–1824 (Paris, 1961), p.298. On Joanna Southcott see J. K. Hopkins, A Woman to Deliver Her People: Joanna Southcott and English Millenarianism in an Era of Revolution (Austin, Texas, 1982). On millenarianism on both sides of the Channel at this time, see C. Garrett, Respectable Folly: Millenarianism in the French Revolution in France and England (Baltimore, 1975). On William Blake and his beliefs see H. Bloom, Blake’s Apocalypse: A Study in Poetic Argument (London, 1963); P. Ackroyd, Blake (London, 1995), and C. Rowlands, Blake and the Bible (New Haven and London, 2010). On Richard brothers see C. Roth, The Nephew of the Almighty: An Experimental Account of the Life and Aftermath of Richard Brothers, RN (London, 1933). A. M. W. Stirling, The Ways of Yesterday: Being Chronicles of the Way Family, 1307–1885 (London, 1930), pp.15–21. For publications on the return of the Jews to Palestine, see V. Clark, Allies for Armageddon: The Rise of Christian Zionism (New Haven and London, 2007), p.56. For Napoleon and the Jews during the Egyptian campaign see

120

My Bookmarks


    Skip to main content